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Woman's horizon on board a sailing vessel

Washing on board
public toilets in Turkey
the daily bus tour
the baby dog


It starts with the washing for example. If there is only the ordinary lot washing, everything would be fine. But there comes the white jeans of him, it must be a white jeans, aren't we sailing? and the uncounted food spilled jumpers of Nastasja and life starts getting complicated.
So on our little journey to Rhodes I went into serious troubles. On Isenisca the washing itself is easy. You only turn on the hot water tap, take some soap and hoopla there it is.
But how do you dry the pants within a few hours? Surely it rains just in this moment. Surely. The men did not take notice from my worries. But I always cried out loud when Nastasja wet her pants the second time on a day. I had only 3 pairs of pants packed. And I would have needed 20.
Everyone would now say, what about nappies? I know. But this is another story and I would put it under education. I talk about washing today.
In Rhodes I was cursing already about the life on board. How in all the world could I leave from a civilised life as mother and housewife, a through and through organised home, for this?
There you have your washing day, where you quickly throw the washing into the drum, the dishwasher hums quietly while you just quickly vacuum clean a few bread crumbs from the carpet. You will have a quick cup of coffee at a friends home and later you'll take a quick warm bath in a bath tube. Everything is easy and quick. What is not quick? Everything is and means quick. Why?
Sailing means slow. For me at least. An advantage. But how do you say? For an advantage a disadvantage. Everything is a question of viewpoints. And a little organisation J
I learned from the experience Rhodes. If you are going to sail with kids, take a lot of underwear with you. Don't count the days but only the weather. And nothing turns out the way you planed it. Luckily.

Nina © 01/1999 nina@schefter.net

Turkish Lifestyle

The fact is, Nastasja does not want to use the public toilets. Its hard to hold this against her.
Last Tuesday on the market we discovered the best toilet of them all.
We sat in a restaurant, just settled and bend over the plate filled with Pide ( Turkish pizza) when a stench filled the room. I turned an asking look to our neighbour. How embarrassing. But the smell came from a corner covered by a pink shower curtain. Pink with flowers. (Allmost everything in Turkey is pink) Behind the curtain is a toilet. Bon Appetite. But slowly I am getting used to Turkey. I stopped thinking about the Turkish architecture style and the modern houses and do not worry about it any more. I mean for example our modern flats bathroom has a shower in which the water run off is higher than the shower itself. The water does never run off by it self. On the other hand the house door is deeper than the garden and we fish daily visitors like earthworms out of the living room. Maybe someone mixed the idea of a shower with the house door. But the door itself is impossible to close, but only to lean on. There is just 1 inch missing until the lock would close it properly. I take it with a smile.

Nina © 02/1999 nina@schefter.net

 

The daily bus tour

Travelling by bus in Turkey, as everywhere in Asia, is always an adventure. Its very entertaining.
You meet all kind of people.
Why do we have a timetable in Europe for public transport? It seems to work without one in Asia.
If you want to use the bus, you just wait on the street until a "Dolmosch” , the public mini bus arrives. It stops on every corner and takes passengers in and out. After shopping the bus waits already in front of the door. I think this is very practical.
It does not matter where you get in or out. The bus fee is always the same. (100.000 TL = 30 cents). Kids are free. I needed a few days until I learned the Turkish word for STOP. "Müseit bir yerde” is the magic word, which means – stop at a convenient place.
I know a lot of reason for taking the bus. Either I have cold feet (the busses are always heated) or I want to learn the Turkish mentality and behaviour. (Spitting out of the bus is one of my favourites )
If I am lucky the bus is not too crowded. If you walk you are actually faster than the bus, because the driver tries to take as much passengers as possible, but what aren't we doing for an adventurous day. Last Tuesday I counted 20 passengers plus the driver in a bus made for 13.
Nastasja likes those tortures as well. Best of all she sits on the window and watches the passing scene on the streets.
There is a lot to see here. The streets and pedestrian ways are filled with goods. Bicycles, motorbikes, heaters (at the moment the seller nr. 1), ..etc. We are driving and watching.
In front of a paint shop sits an old man smoking his pipe. A young boy scurries past with a plate of "Cai” (Turkish tea). On a corner men discuss intensely. Now and than a women with headscarf passes. Neglected cats stray on the streets always looking for food. The streets are very badly in shape and the houses look as if they'll never be finished. A mosque passes. I like the sight of dozens of different shoes waiting for their returning owner, who is praying inside.
Now and than a luxurious building or shop passes and offers expensive goods, jewellery , furniture and so on. I wonder who is shopping there?
Our trip is over. The play ground for Nastasja comes closer and she wants to get out. What was the magic word? "Müseit bir yerde”

Nina © 03/1999 nina@schefter.net

 

A lost battle for a baby street dog

We fought 3 days for this dog. But dogs distemper was stronger than the immune system of the baby dog. Under tears I saw the doctor give it its sleeping injection.

But the problem of the street dogs is not solved this way. Nobody seems to care and nobody does something for the sterilisation of those dogs.

Many Turks know only fear for dogs, although these dogs are very shy but friendly and they look always for someone who cares. Sometimes we get followed by a dog the whole way from and back to the city. I saw a lot of uncomprehending looks, when I let Nastasja pat those dogs. The daily feeding of the street dogs belongs to our routine.

Frank and me talk a lot about an animal on board. A cat or a dog (even a rabbit was something I considered). But we still have not thought about the advantages and disadvantages. I wish for Nastasja there would be a cuddly animal. A dog could be there for watch. But what about sizes? A cat would not need to go walking. But a lot of countries have rules about animals and the immigration is not easy in some countries. If you have experiences about animals on board, I would be glad to hear from you?!

 

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